Posts Tagged ‘TCKs’

August 5th, 2012

We Need You!

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Partner with us in loving missionary kids

10 More Days!

Wow. What an amazing six days it has been. On Tuesday, we needed to raise $1640 a month. Now, we only need $1140! God’s provided $500 in new support since Tuesday!

All summer, our support had been slowly inching its way forward, so it’s fabulous to see it grow by leaps and bounds. It’s been such an encouraging and energizing week. We’ve been abundantly blessed by the generosity of our friends, family and church. God has surprised us with his speedy provision. We are currently at 77% of our monthly support. We are praying to be at 80% by the end of the day, and to be fully funded by August 15th!

We are still looking for 11 people to commit to giving $100 a month. Would you pray about being one of those people?

We know that not every one can commit to giving $100 each month, but don’t let the amount prevent you from giving. Commitments of any amount help us reach our goal of returning to Germany! Actually the majority of this week’s new support came from commitments that were smaller than $100 per month.

We are eager to see how God will provide over these final 10 days. Ten days, Folks! We can’t wait to get back to Germany and our BFA kids.

We Need You

This morning, we shared this video with our church. We would love for you to watch it and pass it along. We need you to partner with us and Jesus in loving missionary kids!

 

June 1st, 2011

Grad Is Upon Us

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In two days, 60-something seniors will graduate from Black Forest Academy. This is a big deal. It’s a big deal because it’s a milestone they’ve been working towards for 12-plus years, but it’s also a big deal because graduation will usher in what will probably be the biggest change of their lives.

Senior Transition Day

In April, I had the privilege of participating in Senior Transition Day. It was a day meant to help prepare them for transitioning to their passport countries. The day covered topics like building community, what it’s like to go to college as a Third Culture Kid, how to say goodbye to BFA, and how to say hello to America. The Seniors even received practical information about opening a bank account, what documents they need to take, and what to consider when getting a phone plan. I spoke on a panel just for the girls. We talked about managing your time and money, The Freshman 15, drinking, dating, boundaries, sex, extracurriculars and more. I was very excited to participate and greatly enjoyed my time with the girls. I hope the Seniors learned from this day; I certainly did. I walked away from Senior Transition Day with a greater appreciation for the immensity of the change these kids are about to encounter.

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December 9th, 2009

Grief

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Hopefully you know by now (unless you’ve just stumbled across our blog) that we are planning to work with missionary kids at Black Forest Academy. As part of our preparation, I’ve been reading (rather slowly) Third Culture Kids by David Pollock and Ruth Van Reken. Missionary kids are third culture kids (TCKs), which means they’ve spent a significant period of their formative years outside their passport countries. I’ve also been going to counseling for the past few months. One of the things that keeps coming up, in the book and counseling, is grief.

I moved a lot growing up. I believe I moved 12 times in my first 14 years of life. I don’t know if I technically qualify as a TCK, but I do relate to some of the aspects of TCK life. One thing I’d never realized is that there is a grieving process to moving. Let me tell you, that was an eye-opening chapter. According to the book, the transition cycle for moving is Involvement, Leaving, Transition, Entering and Reinvolvment. Okay, in and of itself, that doesn’t really mean much. The wow moment for me was reading about the Leaving stage, which isn’t talking about getting on a plane and heading to your new home, although that’s part of it, but about emotionally removing yourself from your home. You begin to loosen emotional ties, back out of responsibilities and refrain from taking new ones, and stop making new friends.

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